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Namibia's 42%
Namibia is the example that the industry invokes whenever discussion focuses on best practice in nature and wildlife conservation. With good reason. The story began in tragic circumstances with pressure on endangered species, poaching and armed conflict in the early 1990s. This was before the Namibian government decided to appoint a number of local organisations around the country to take over conservation work.

This decision created a sense of ownership and such a large number of tourist attractions throughout the country that today 42% of Namibia’s natural environment and wildlife is protected in one form or another. The schemes also generate more than DKK 33 million of revenue annually for local communities that help run the programmes.

The conservation work has only become a success because a wide range of stakeholders have taken responsibility for the country’s resources and have come together from various sectors. These sectors that would otherwise have conflicting interests (e.g. hunting and safari) now have a mutual interest to work together to create a responsible system for protecting and safeguarding affected species.

Source: NamibiaTourism.com

Systematic focus on good framework conditions
The Namibia case is one of the clearest examples of how political work at the highest level coupled with local engagement and ownership can ensure the right framework conditions for tourism.

The priority given to tourism in Namibia only came about because a number of institutions that contribute to the overall structure of the industry dedicated the time and resources to promoting the common interest of national development.

The situation in Namibia therefore improved because there was a business incentive and an economic need to protect resources for posterity. This created a firm basis for an adventure tourism industry in Namibia. In terms of its global image, the industry is now a significant and powerful operator and an important economic driving force in Namibia.

The Namibia case is one of the clearest examples of how political work at the highest level coupled with local engagement and ownership can ensure the right framework conditions for tourism.

The main tool we now have for such framework development in the Greenland tourism industry is the legislation on exclusive rights

Adventure tourism and framework conditions in Greenland
Natural and cultural resources are the building blocks for adventure tourism. Since adventure tourists focus less on traditional infrastructure and more on authentic, participatory, active experiences, it is often more beneficial for a destination to invest in establishing framework conditions for the industry’s use of and access to nature, wildlife and cultural history.

The main tool we now have for such framework development in the Greenland tourism industry is the legislation on exclusive rights that allows tourism operators to apply for exclusive rights to use areas of land for specific tour activities.

Concessions allow Greenland-based operators to have a safety net in the form of rights of use and a better basis for investment for developing existing products and new ones.

The framework is therefore about strengthening the internal regulation of the industry and about creating more opportunities to strengthen and develop products by working with external tour operators without the risk of unfair competition destroying or undermining the revenue basis.

Exclusive rights stimulate future business development
The vast majority of Greenlandic experiences do not need the exclusivity that concessions provide, but Visit Greenland believes that four areas in particular need concessions: River fishing, trophy hunting, wilderness camps and heliskiing

Areas such as trout fishing, trophy hunting and wilderness camping, in particular, are sensitive to the issue of nature and wildlife development. These activities are also subject to public scrutiny because they interfere in resources which we have a shared responsibility to manage sustainably, so that future generations might also benefit from them.

Last but not least, tour operators that look after a product’s basic resources are what create added value for adventure tourists. This helps tourists to understand why and how the protection of resources is an important part of the experience.

Areas such as trout fishing, trophy hunting and wilderness camping, in particular, are sensitive to the issue of nature and wildlife development.

READ THE OTHER STORIES IN THE ADVENTURE SERIES ABOUT GREENLAND

 

WHAT IS ADVENTURE TRAVEL IN GREENLAND?

The core values of adventure tourism are what underpin tourism in Greenland. Growth in employment and income in the coming years will come from companies that think sustainably, take responsibility for culture and the environment and understand how to involve visitors in active experiences.

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KEY FACTS ON ADVENTURE TRAVEL

Between 2010 and 2014, the adventure tourism industry grew by 195%. Greenland has every opportunity to become part of this international trend which is generating more money for local communities and raising awareness of responsible tourism.

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ADVENTURE IN PRACTICE - GREENLAND OUTDOORS

Jens-Pavia Brandt’s company Greenland Outdoors specialises in combining kayaking, wildlife tours, storytelling, and hiking in the backcountry around Kangerlussuaq.

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ADVENTURE SEGMENTS IN GREENLAND

Visit Greenland's work with mapping and segmentation of tourists in Greenland is closely related to the definitions of adventure by the Adventure Travel Trade Association, and in this article we will explore how the two models are connected.

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ADVENTURE IN PRACTICE - INUK HOSTELS

Liisi Egede Hegelund offers a combination of accommodation and cultural encounters in a backcountry oasis right in the heart of Nuuk’s urban environment, and her concept shows how adventure in Greenland can be based just as much in urban settings as in the mountains.

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FRAMEWORK CONDITIONS AS A TOOL FOR ENHANCING VALUE

Natural and cultural resources are the building blocks for adventure tourism, and public-private collaboration on preservation and protection can create a platform for sustainable resource management and future business development.

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ADVENTURE IN PRACTICE - TRAVELLODGE GREENLAND

Travellodge Greenland in East Greenland has created strong adventure tourism products. It is now a growing business based on local knowledge, passion and a desire to make a difference in the local community.

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SHARED RESPONSIBILITY THROUGHOUT THE SUPPLY CHAIN

Partnership between companies in a supply chain can be critical for local and global implementation of business development based on sustainable and responsible business practice.

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ADVENTURE IN PRACTICE - PGI GREENLAND

PGI Greenland is a newly set-up company in the Disko Bay. In a busy market, PGI Greenland has found a niche in adventure-based tourism, developed in close collaboration with local logistics providers and an international partner.

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HUMAN RESOURCES AND ADVENTURE

Professional guides are one of a tour operator’s main assets. The guides must have specialised knowledge that can inspire and help the company’s clients in a way that is safe and responsible.

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ADVENTURE TRAVEL TRADE ASSOCIATION

Together with a few domestic operators Visit Greenland uses the global Adventure Travel Trade Association network to help promote the development of the adventure tourism industry in Greenland.

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